Astronomy

Identify this 2 axis motorized tripod

Identify this 2 axis motorized tripod


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I am NOT an astronomy person, so this may be a dumb question, however I have recently found a tripod that appears to be for star tracking as far as I can guess. I would like to know the type of tripod and if possible the brand as it is not labeled and I do not know how to operate it.


It appears to be an older version of the Bushnell Voyager Sky Tour 800x70mm Refractor Telescope

Full manual here


What is a Tripod Head?

Tripod head is the tripod accessory that connects the camera to the tripod legs. You can also mount the camera directly on to the tripod if the threads are matching. Tripod head gives you the flexibility to align your camera in multiple angles and orientations.

Some tripod comes with integrated tripod heads. So, you cannot use any other head with such tripods. These tripods are low-cost ones targeted towards the point and shoot camera users.


10 Different Tripod Head Types For Photography & Video

Ball Heads

As the name implies, this is a simple ball and socket joint that is an addition to many entry level tripods. Unlocking the ball head allows movement in all three axis which provides great flexibility for composition.

An advantage to this type of head is quick adjustments however one can be limited in how heavy a rig can be used on a ball head. I know there are some really beefy ball heads out there, but I feel that is a direction most photographers don’t need to go.

If my equipment is substantial enough to require a heavy duty ball head, I would prefer to use a different type of head. Your mileage may vary. I find ball heads to be most useful on mini pods, travel tripods, and monopods.

Pan-Tilt Head

This is one of the most common tripod head types you can find in the market, and for good reason. Pan-tilt heads swivel on the base for a smooth panning motion, and tilt up and down for likewise adjustments. This makes them great for micro adjustments for nailing the composition while also delivering great video results.

Also certain pan-tilt heads can also flip the mounting plate 90 degrees to allow for vertical camera orientation. A 3-way pan-tilt head allows for the adjustments to be both more precise and heavier duty. They are often paired with a set of legs as a complete unit, but there are individuals units out there as well.

Fluid Head

A fluid head is a variation of the basic pan-tilt head with the motions dampened by a hydraulic fluid. I’ve also seen them marketed as a Video Head. Why would you want a dampened motion? Primarily for video and motion picture use.

One of the banes of amateur videography is jerky panning motions. Whether side to side or up and down, a jerky movement will take viewers out of a scene faster than a Tom Cruise character can run down an enemy agent.

In previous articles, I’ve talked a lot about limiting movement in video shots, since I think most needed movement is better accomplished by camera motion and editing. But if I must pan during a scene, a fluid head is one of the better options.

Geared Head

Another part of the motion picture and video equipment selection is a geared head. This tripod head type is also great for realestate, architectural and milky way photography.

Often configured in a similar layout to the fluid heads, these heavy duty heads use gears to accomplish the movements. Available in medium duty and very heavy duty, this is the type of head most likely to found under a high end movie or video camera rig.

In the field or in studio. Advantages are reliability, repeatability, and extremely smooth movements. Disadvantages are weight and high cost. Besides motion picture use, a geared head would be great to use for extreme close up photography. Scientific, medical, real estate and advertising are fields these heads would also be at home in.

Pistol Grip

Now here is a fun head to use in the field. The pistol grips I’ve seen or used are ball heads, but with the control release mechanism configured as a squeeze trigger instead of some sort of lever or screw. The primary advantage is speed.

Using a long lens on a monopod or a lighter tripod at a sporting event or on a nature shoot, having a pistol grip allows for rapid movement to frame the subject in motion, and then lock it fairly solidly by releasing the grip just before clicking the shutter.

It took me 80 times longer to write that than the actual event would occur in real life. One possible drawback is most of these heads are not sturdy enough for really heavy camera rigs. Where appropriate, though, these are a great tool for the action oriented photographer or videographer.

Gimbal Heads

Okay, if you really want to talk about fun for action, the gimbal head is where it’s at! A gimbal head allows you to perfectly balance the camera and lens combination so that one can get the ultimate stability coupled with one of the easiest movements of any tripod head.

With a gimbal head, the center of gravity of the camera rig is set once, and then all the other movements can be accomplished within that stable setting. A real boon to nature photographers using very long lenses, it also is the primary design idea utilized for panoramic photography.

There is another type of gimbal head, the stabilized mount, that is extremely useful for hand held videography. Think SteadyCam, but pared down for less extravagant cameras. There is a vast array of gimbal mounts in many different usage categories and prices. This is easily one of the most fun and functional tripod head types I have used for video and photography.

Motorized Heads

There are at least two types of motorized heads. First, the geared head with the movements actuated by electric motors instead of a hand crank. I find this to be a rather specialized piece of equipment. Applications include motion picture photography and videography, scientific photography, and remote photography.

Remote photography is a genre that is getting more accessible by the day, with smart phone controls and other wireless options. Imagine, what once required a government grant can now be set up by a serious amateur with a limited budget.

Well, if several hundred or a couple of thousand dollars isn’t limited compared to multi millions, than I’ll stop writing right now.

Rotor Heads

This is the second type of motorized head I was considering above. What I have rented and may yet purchase is a computerized motor head will all the movements required for panoramic photography. The newest ones are of capable of 360 degree spherical panoramas. Panos are not just for real estate any more.

There are many wonderful exhibits online of panoramic photography that are truly outstanding. Some units are all in one, some have separate control panels. All are pretty expensive and new or updated models seem to be coming out monthly.

Monopod

Hey! That’s not a tripod head! I know, but I like talking about monopods whenever I’m discussing tripods. The worst tripod for any shot is the one you aren’t using. So, I like to always have in my grab bag of gear a good monopod.

Just like binoculars are better than not having a telescope for backyard astronomy, using a monopod is going to be better than not using a tripod at all for certain situations. For me, those situations are likely to be sports, nature, and marginal lighting conditions.

Getting used to carrying a decent monopod may increase your ratio of good images to throw away files. Just saying…

Arca-Swiss plates

Another tripod head types worth talking about in any tripod article is the quick release system that has become a virtual industry standard, the Arca-Swiss. A quick release does just what the name sounds like. It lets you quickly release and remount a camera or lens to a tripod head.

Some brands have their own proprietary system, but the Arca-Swiss is used by many different manufacturers as the mounting system in their better tripod heads. Having one standard set of release plates allows the photographer to not spend all their time trying to make sure you got the right plate for the right head. Leave the plate attached to the cameras or lenses, and then mount them on whatever head you are using.

Fluid, gimbal, pan-tilt, ball and socket, all can be found with this type of quick release. If you have a need for several different types of tripods and heads, this can really ease up your job.

If you want to learn more about tripods, check out my mega guide here on the best tripods for all budgets, uses and cameras!


Contents

When used as an astronomical telescope mount, the biggest advantage of an alt-azimuth mount is the simplicity of its mechanical design. The primary disadvantage is its inability to follow astronomical objects in the night sky as the Earth spins on its axis. On the other hand, an equatorial mount only needs to be rotated about a single axis, at a constant rate, to follow the rotation of the night sky (diurnal motion). Altazimuth mounts need to be rotated about both axes at variable rates, achieved via microprocessor based two-axis drive systems, to track equatorial motion. This imparts an uneven rotation to the field of view that also has to be corrected via a microprocessor based counter rotation system. [1] On smaller telescopes an equatorial platform [2] is sometimes used to add a third "polar axis" to overcome these problems, providing an hour or more of motion in the direction of right ascension to allow for astronomical tracking. The design also does not allow for the use of mechanical setting circles to locate astronomical objects although modern digital setting circles have removed this shortcoming.

Another limitation is the problem of gimbal lock at zenith pointing. When tracking at elevations close to 90°, the azimuth axis must rotate very quickly if the altitude is exactly 90°, the speed is infinite. Thus, altazimuth telescopes, although they can point in any direction, cannot track smoothly within a "zenith blind spot", commonly 0.5 [3] or 0.75 degrees [4] from the zenith. (i.e. at elevations greater than 89.5° or 89.25° respectively.)

Current applications Edit

Typical current applications of altazimuth mounts include the following.

In the largest telescopes, the mass and cost of an equatorial mount is prohibitive and they have been superseded by computer-controlled altazimuth mounts. [5] The simple structure of an altazimuth mount allows significant cost reductions, in spite of the additional cost associated with the more complex tracking and image-orienting mechanisms. [6] An altazimuth mount also reduces the cost in the dome structure covering the telescope since the simplified motion of the telescope means the structure can be more compact. [7]

  • Beginner telescopes: Altazimuth mounts are cheap and simple to use. : John Dobson popularized a simplified altazimuth mount design for Newtonian reflectors because of its ease of construction Dobson's innovation was to use non-machined parts for the mount that could be found in any hardware store such as plywood, formica, and plastic plumbing parts combined with modern materials like nylon or teflon.
  • "GoTo" telescopes: It has often proved more convenient to build a mechanically simpler altazimuth mount and use a motion controller to manipulate both axes simultaneously to track an object, when compared with a more mechanically complex equatorial mount that requires minimally complex control of a single motor.

A heliostat at the THÉMIS experimental station in France. The mirror rotates on an alt-azimuth mount. The pointing direction of the mirror is perpendicular to its surface.

One of the 8.2 m (320 in) telescopes at Paranal Observatory. The entire building constitutes the altazimuth mount, saving on mass and cost.

A refracting telescope (with finderscope and accessories) on a small alt-azimuth mount.


Identify this Celestron scope

So I got this Celestron Scope. Don't know much about it, other than the cross member to the tripod is broken and needs some help. I think that It's a spotting scope (5 or 6 inch)? Looking for help in identifying it as well as ideas on how to fix the tripod mount.

Attached Thumbnails

#2 Jon Isaacs

I think it's a Celestron C-5 (5 inch SCT) on a EQ-2 mount, I think called it the G-5.

Here's a G-5 with drives on Astromart.

#3 DLuders

You can read all about your Celestron C5 on Uncle Rod's Used CAT Buyer's Guide, pages 102-106. On that Synta mount, it was called a "G5".

Edited by DLuders, 15 March 2020 - 12:48 PM.

#4 macdonjh

That tripod is still in production. Try contacting Celestron or SkyWatcher and ask for the spreader for an EQ-2 mount's tripod. They may be able and willing to sell you the part. One of the astronomy retailers (e.g. our host, Astronomics) may be able to help as well.

You could also replace the tripod with a heavy-duty camera tripod. I think the center bolt (for fastening the mount to the tripod) is 3/8"-16, which is a common size bolt.

A DIY solution would be to install an appropriate length of light chain from Home Depot.

Edited by macdonjh, 15 March 2020 - 12:58 PM.

#5 Kasmos

How about using a small piece of metal to bridge the broken bracket?

#6 Daveatvt01

You can see the tiny “5” printed in the plastic between the word “celestron” and the serial number on the secondary but they did not make it easy to find

#7 markb

Bill Vorce at TelescopeWarehouse might have the Meade version of the speader.

Measure one of the three spreader 'arms' to see if his matches.

#8 G-Tower

Found yourself a goldmine there!

#9 Pete W

Phobos2, in your 3rd pic I see holes in the corrector retaining ring but no screws that would/should hold the ring onto the scope. Are these screws unnecessary in this version of the C5 for securing the corrector to the scope? I know in my older C5 the ring and corrector would fall out without the screws.

Edited by Pete W, 15 March 2020 - 01:33 PM.

#10 clamchip

Phobos2, in your 3rd pic I see holes in the corrector retaining ring but no screws that would/should hold the ring onto the scope. Are these screws unnecessary in this version of the C5 for securing the corrector to the scope? I know in my older C5 the ring and corrector would fall out without the screws.

The retaining ring is threaded and those two holes are for a spanner wrench to undo

the ring. Celestron puts a dollop of glue on the joint to keep the ring from rattling loose.

The first generation C5 was built this way. Then the 6 screws holding the retainer.

With the reintroduction of the C5 with a white tube Celestron went back to the screw

#11 pierce

In addition to the '5', note the FL=1250mm, and its f/10, so the aperture is 1250/10 = 125mm which is 5"

those early generation EQ 2 mounts weren't very good. I'd consider getting a newer EQ5 (also sold as the Orion SkyViewPro, or Celestron CG5) mount to smooth things out.

#12 CHASLX200

#13 Pete W

The retaining ring is threaded and those two holes are for a spanner wrench to undo

the ring.

#14 clamchip

I couldn't remember the reason why Celestron stopped making the C5 so I

The C5 actually cost Celestron more to make than the C8.

Celestron ordered and fabricated far more parts for the 8 than the 5, this made the

In 1985 during Halley's comet, and Celestron running at capacity, it was decided

to stop making the C5 and concentrate on meeting C8 production.

Seven years later consumer demand prompted Celestron to reintroduce the much

#15 phobos2

I think it's a Celestron C-5 (5 inch SCT) on a EQ-2 mount, I think called it the G-5.

Here's a G-5 with drives on Astromart.

https://astromart.co. scope-and-mount

Jon

Thanks for the clarification.

#16 phobos2

You can read all about your Celestron C5 on Uncle Rod's Used CAT Buyer's Guide, pages 102-106. On that Synta mount, it was called a "G5".

That was great information! Thanks

Seems that I may have stumbled on a decent scope from what I have been reading.

Edited by phobos2, 15 March 2020 - 08:31 PM.

#17 phobos2

How about using a small piece of metal to bridge the broken bracket?

That was an idea I was toying with. That or wood to bridge it. The adhesive was the biggest question. Needed something that would take the stress and hold onto either the metal or wood. Plastic is definitely out.

#18 phobos2

You can see the tiny “5” printed in the plastic between the word “celestron” and the serial number on the secondary but they did not make it easy to find

WOW. until you pointed it out. I would have never noticed it.

#19 phobos2

Found yourself a goldmine there!

That's what it seems. If I am understanding what I am reading, this scope cost as much as a C8. Ouch for them.

#20 phobos2

In addition to the '5', note the FL=1250mm, and its f/10, so the aperture is 1250/10 = 125mm which is 5"

those early generation EQ 2 mounts weren't very good. I'd consider getting a newer EQ5 (also sold as the Orion SkyViewPro, or Celestron CG5) mount to smooth things out.

Once again, never noticed the writing on that part until this group pointed it out to me. I had to look closely to see where you found this info.

#21 phobos2

I couldn't remember the reason why Celestron stopped making the C5 so I

refreshed my memory.

The C5 actually cost Celestron more to make than the C8.

Celestron ordered and fabricated far more parts for the 8 than the 5, this made the

8 far more economical.

In 1985 during Halley's comet, and Celestron running at capacity, it was decided

to stop making the C5 and concentrate on meeting C8 production.

Seven years later consumer demand prompted Celestron to reintroduce the much

missed compact C5.

Robert

This was great information. So, is this a sought after scope?

#22 clamchip

This was great information. So, is this a sought after scope?

Once Celestron reintroduced the C5 in 1992 it was completely redesigned and better than before.

The reintroduced 1992 came in white and available as the C5 classic and C5+ the same optical tube

went black like yours in the mid 1990's and Starbright coatings were introduced. Next was Starbright

#23 CHASLX200

I couldn't remember the reason why Celestron stopped making the C5 so I

refreshed my memory.

The C5 actually cost Celestron more to make than the C8.

Celestron ordered and fabricated far more parts for the 8 than the 5, this made the

8 far more economical.

In 1985 during Halley's comet, and Celestron running at capacity, it was decided

to stop making the C5 and concentrate on meeting C8 production.

Seven years later consumer demand prompted Celestron to reintroduce the much

missed compact C5.

Robert

There are a few rare bird complete black C5's made around late 1984 and 85 before they stopped making them. Odd to see a orange and black fork mounted C5 side by side.

#24 phobos2

Once Celestron reintroduced the C5 in 1992 it was completely redesigned and better than before.

The reintroduced 1992 came in white and available as the C5 classic and C5+ the same optical tube

went black like yours in the mid 1990's and Starbright coatings were introduced. Next was Starbright

XLT coatings, even better.

Robert

Turns out this scope has the Starbright coatings.

#25 ssecrest

I have this same scope and was wondering if anyone could give some help with the mount. I am looking to put this scope on a more basic tripod (for example the Celestron heavy-duty alt-azimuth tripod that they suggest for their current C5 scopes) but I am not sure if there is something that I would need to do to my older scope to make it compatible. I notice that the current C5 has a mounting bar that runs the length of the tube, while this one is just a couple of inches. I am a newby and don't yet know what I do/don't know. Any advice would be appreciated.


Help identify this tripod

Need help in identifying this tripod ( maybe an old Televue? ).
This is the thickest wooden tripod I've ever seen,
and the legs fold, as the front clamps swing out of the way vertically to allow passage of each leg to fold outward and up into the upper gap.
I believe the wood is ash?
Posting 6 pics to follow.
I would like to learn more about it by finding what it really is.
Need the help as this will be up for trading material too.
Only have wiped it down and not restored it, as it will go to a new owner.

Attached Thumbnails

#2 Michael Cave

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#3 Michael Cave

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#4 Michael Cave

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#5 Michael Cave

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#6 Michael Cave

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#7 Michael Cave

#8 Don Trinko

#9 Michael Cave

The oak tray sure looks hand built but, I remember a tripod like this with the same hardware ( from long ago ),
just can't recall the manufacturer.
I'm sure someone can bring this to light.

#10 Jon Isaacs

It looks like a custom made or home made to me. It is very well made and most likely very sturdy. Wood also minimizes vibration. Don T.

I think parts of it are certainly custom made, the spreader and probably the clamps.

But the tripod itself looks to be a commercial unit that has been modified so it is easier to use. The missing bolt is indicative that it once used two bolts and probably not that top clamp. But I could be wrong.

This probably belongs in the classics section where it is more likely that someone would recognize it.

#11 Michael Cave

The upper bolt is not missing, the extension leg's bolt hole is offset about an inch below the outer's hole.
That's what got me to asking questions.

#12 Michael Cave

here's another showning the offset holes leading me to believe that the clamp and the one bolt position takes care of both.

Attached Thumbnails

#13 Michael Cave

and, this shot sows how the outer side of the clamp swings away to allow the folding of the legs upwards for transport/storage.

Attached Thumbnails

#14 Jon Isaacs

The upper bolt is not missing, the extension leg's bolt hole is offset about an inch below the outer's hole.
That's what got me to asking questions.

I see. It appears the various holes allow you to adjust the height of the tripod by choosing different combinations of holes. Simple and effective.

To me it looks like a tripod of some known make, unknown to me, from the classic era. Someone in the Classic forum can likely fill you in.

#15 Michael Cave

I really appreciate you being so accessible,
I'm posting here because I'm fairly new here and this is the " catch all " place to post.
Let me know how to get this post to the masses.

#16 Michael Cave

I had a brain f-art, Is there a way I could put a link on the classic forum to this?
Of course, I don't know how to do that! ( I need guidance, where's John Crilly? )

#17 csa/montana

Den Mama & Gold Star Award Winner

Michael, let's give the thread a little more of a chance here if no one can help you, I can then transfer the thread to Classics.

#18 Michael Cave

Will do, you have to know I'll keep coming back to this thread, ( It's in my favorites ).
Just a tip that will be embedded here, to get the close up pics posted here, just hold a regular old magnifier up to the camera lens, as was done in some of the shots.
I'm sure this technique was shared here before but, a little reminder for us new folks, ( just remember to see good focus before you press the shutter button ).

#19 Michael Cave

Jon Isaacs, and Don Trinko,

Sorry for getting you fellows mixed up in my responses but, you two guys are neck in neck as the in-the-know folks I look up to!
Take this as a compliment, You both are tops in my book, and amongst legends that have helped me and many others along the way!

P.S.
If you want to see my complete list of who's who, ( in no particular order of great telescope folks, just ask! ).

#20 Starpoke

#21 Starpoke

#22 dawziecat

While the resemblance is strong to my old Polarex (Unitron) 4" equatorial tripod. There are differences as well. Legs on the 4" did not allow for height adjustment or folding at all as I recall. Each leg slat was one piece. Only the 4" was offered with a tripod shelf at all according to the catalog so if this was a Unitron, it had to be a 4" or a smaller one was fitted with a shelf by the owner. And the hardware attaching the shelf to the legs? Totally different than what I recall on mine.

Unitron style . . . but not Unitron. My guess. Perhaps a smaller Unitron fitted after-market with a shelf?
And although I owned a Unitron, decades ago, I am no expert. So . . . FWIW. I am prepared to be wrong here.


Question Unknown Object

Hi everyone
I took a picture of some stars last April with my Nikon. This was the first time I have ever taken pictures of stars and I'm still very much new to all this. I actually took about 20 or so pictures and was just really trying to get the grips of it. Think I captured a shooting star which was nice, but I was curious to the object top middle right.
It looks like a star but it has a burst effect coming out each side. This picture is original not been edited.
As I'm all new to this I'm sorry if i havent really explained it properly, but ill try now to attach a picture.
Any help with an ID would be great.
Was using a Nikon d3400 with a 35mm lens F/1.8, 15 Sec Exposure, ISO 400

New photo by Greg Stuart

Whatunearth

Sorry its this object here, not seen anything like it on my other pictures.

New photo by Greg Stuart

Dcstark

Greg pretty good effort for a first timer. Was the camera mounted on a tripod? Also, do you have a cable release for the shutter?

At first, I thought you might have bumped the tripod or that you'd somehow managed to capture the Andromeda galaxy as that portion of the photo was being scanned, but it is too localized for a bump or shake, and the position in the sky is wrong for Andromeda.

It may be that something passed between the camera and that star around the moment that set of pixels were recorded. Or there may be a smudge on the lens. You'd have to compare the other photos to see if there is a comparable smear in the same position (which would indicate something on the lens).

Sorry its this object here, not seen anything like it on my other pictures.

New photo by Greg Stuart

Whatunearth

Greg pretty good effort for a first timer. Was the camera mounted on a tripod? Also, do you have a cable release for the shutter?

At first, I thought you might have bumped the tripod or that you'd somehow managed to capture the Andromeda galaxy as that portion of the photo was being scanned, but it is too localized for a bump or shake, and the position in the sky is wrong for Andromeda.

It may be that something passed between the camera and that star around the moment that set of pixels were recorded. Or there may be a smudge on the lens. You'd have to compare the other photos to see if there is a comparable smear in the same position (which would indicate something on the lens).


Identify this 2 axis motorized tripod - Astronomy

Zhiyun SMOOTH-XS 2-Axis Smartphone Stabilizer Gimbal

Key Features:

  • 2-axis motorized stabilization (pan/roll)
  • Built-in 10.2" selfie stick
  • Collapsible, ultracompact design
  • ZY Cami iOS/Android companion app
  • Hand gesture recording for vlogs and tutorials
  • SmartFollow 2.0 automatic subject tracking
  • One-touch beautification function
  • Supports phones up to 3.5" wide, including the iPhone XS Max (requires iOS 10.0 or higher or Android 7.0 or higher)
  • Up to 5.5-hour built-in battery
  • One-button switching between landscape and portrait modes
  • Panorama, slow-motion, time-lapse, hyperlapse, and motion-lapse
  • Easy editing SMART mode with built-in templates containing camera movements, transitions, color grading, music, and special effects


Packing a built-in selfie stick and offering automated functions such as tracking via the companion app, the Zhiyun-Tech SMOOTH-XS, in white, is designed to provide a simple yet multifaceted filmmaking experience with your smartphone. If you're shooting a vlog video or tutorial, the ZY Cami iOS/Android app allows you to use a hand gesture to begin recording or snap a photo. You can set the gimbal down on the included mini tripod and work hands-free. The app's SmartFollow 2.0 tracking feature can be set to follow you and continually keep you in the frame as you move about. If you're not happy with the way you or your subject appear in the final image, a one-touch beautification tool instantly touches up certain imperfections to improve the look, and the beautification settings can be customized manually for different scenarios.

The SMOOTH-XS is a 2-axis gimbal stabilizer lets you attach and balance your phone in just seconds. It supports phones up to 3.5" wide, including the iPhone XS Max, and it runs for up to 5.5 hours on a built-in battery. Not only is the gimbal ultracompact, but it's also collapsible for even more portability. The upper section slides down to make storage and travel easier. When ready to shoot, just slide that section up and begin, or telescope out the integrated selfie stick for even more capability. The selfie stick extends up to 10.2", allowing you to capture shots from more angles as well as shoot selfie and vlog videos. Also, with a simple button press, you can switch from landscape to portrait mode to start live streaming to social media platforms such as Instagram.

Other app features include panorama, slow-motion, time-lapse, hyperlapse, and motion-lapse. There's also an easy editing SMART mode that lets you select from a variety of built-in templates that will automatically apply certain camera movements, transitions, color grading, music, and special effects, depending on the template.

A USB cable, safety hand strap, and storage bag are also included in addition to the mini tripod as part of the kit. The internal battery of the gimbal can be charged from a standard USB charger or a USB power bank using the supplied USB cable.

Zhiyun SMOOTH-XS Stabilizer
USB Charging Cable
Mini Tripod
Hand Strap
Storage Bag


Write A Review

Focus Motor Compatibility

Celestron Telescope Design

Compatible with #94155 Focus Motor?

Add tracking and tracking correction capabilities to any setup that uses a Celestron CG-4 equatorial mount. The right ascension motor drive allows the telescope to track a star’s movement through the night sky, and the addition of a declination motor gives you the ability to make adjustments in all four directions with the included drive corrector hand controller.

With this drive system mounted on a properly polar-aligned telescope, the user can do visual observations or sketches without objects constantly drifting out of the field if view. Astrophotography is also possible when a mount has dual-axis drive with drive corrector capabilities.

The Celestron dual-axis motor drive system is powered by four D-cell batteries in a self-contained battery pack. The drive can be used in either the Northern or Southern Hemisphere. To change hemispheres (reverse the motor’s direction), simply flip the “N/Off/S” switch on the drive corrector hand controller.

Note: This motor drive requires a 6 Volt input. It cannot be used with a 12 Volt power source like the Celestron PowerTank or a 12 Volt AC adapter.

The drive corrector hand controller can be used to move the telescope at different speeds. This is achieved by choosing the desired speed on a switch marked “2x/4x/8x.” Twice the sidereal rate, or 2x, is used for guiding on a star when doing astrophotography. The 4x speed is used to center objects in the eyepiece. The 8x speed can be used for centering objects in the finderscope as well as the eyepiece.

This package includes an RA and Dec motor, clutch, mounting brackets and hardware, drive corrector hand controller, and power pack.

Celestron cart-is-visible filter-category::Mount_Accessories inventory-status::M product product-file::199 Telescope Accessories add-to-cart 2017-08-03


EVscope Best Features

Autonomous Field Detection: Simple and accurate pointing and tracking

The Autonomous Field Detection (AFD) software automatically detects stars in the field-of-view and identifies its pointing direction by a comparison with a 20 million-star coordinates database. Coupled with magneto-accelerometers and with a motorized mount, AFD allows the eVscope to automatically align with celestial coordinates and accurately pinpoint and identify any object in the sky.

Compact and Lightweight: The eVscope fits in a backpack

Light amplification means that a small telescope can also be powerful without putting on much weight. This telescope is so small that you can carry it in a backpack! The eVscope is a perfect grab and go telescope weighing at 19.8-pounds (9 Kg), including the tripod. The telescope is 25.5-inches tall and 9-inches wide (65 cm and 23 cm), and the tripod is also compact with extendable legs.

Contribute to Space Science: Join the eVscope community

In partnership with the SETI Institute, connect your eVscope to a network of thousands of eVscope owners around the world and help scientists all the while seeing special astronomical events like exoplanet transits or NEA passing. See this live, through your eVscope, while they are happening!

Want to learn more about the eVscope? Click here to listen to the difference between the eVscope and STELLINA as discussed on Space Junk Podcast.

Smart telescopes have created controversy in the astro community for their lack of technical manual features. Still, there is no doubt that smart telescopes allow anyone to explore the universe with their computerized features at any level and anywhere in the world.

Find your way into the stars and explore the universe with the Unistellar eVscope.